Title

Article about the history of Montpelier, the Thomaston mansion of Gen. Henry Kno

Source

Down East

Date

9-1-1994

Pages

36-39, 58-59

Abstract

Article about the history of Montpelier, the Thomaston mansion of Gen. Henry Knox, of Revolutionary War fame. The original mansion was torn down in 1871 to make way for the Knox and Lincoln Railroad, but through the efforts of the local chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR), work began building a replica of the historic structure in 1929, just shortly before the country slipped into the Depression. Unfortunately, the construction methods used to build the replica left the mansion with serious moisture problems, which constantly worked havoc on the exterior paint and interior walls. With only a modest endowment, the Knox Memorial Association proved unable to cope with the upkeep of the mansion, leading it to donate the structure to the state in 1965. With declining attendance and tight budgets cause by the recent recession, the state has allowed the mansion to become outwardly shabby. Through recent, efforts of volunteers and a group called the Friends of Montpelier there is some hope that the mansions short- and long-term needs will be addressed.

Subjects

Historic buildings Thomaston Montpelier

Full text is not available here. Please contact the Library for a copy of the article.

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