Title

"What's in a Picture?" piece on Milo's centennial celebration on Labor Day in 19

Authors

Joshua F. Moore

Source

Down East

Date

9-1-2004

Pages

82

Abstract

"What's in a Picture?" piece on Milo's centennial celebration on Labor Day in 1923, where for the first time in the country, more than 75 members of the Ku Klux Klan marched in broad daylight in their white robes and pointed hoods. The group's message in Maine was to reject immigrants, most of whom were Catholics. Most of the spectators appear unfazed at the spectacle. In 1924, the Klan counted 20,000 members in Maine; elected local candidates in Portland, Sanford, Saco, and Rockland; and supported the successful gubernatorial campaign of Ralph Owen Brewster. By 1931, membership had dwindled to 188.

Subjects

Ku Klux Klan, Photographs

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