Title

In 1967, the now-banned chemical DDT had softened the eggs of bald eagles so dra

Authors

Cathy Genthner

Source

Portland Monthly

Date

5-2008

Pages

33-35, 76-77

Abstract

In 1967, the now-banned chemical DDT had softened the eggs of bald eagles so drastically that there were only 21 nesting pairs in the state. Bill Moulton's family owned a farm in Pittston and Nahumkeag Island in the Kennebec River, and he saw many eagles as a youth. He adopted the recommendations of Charlie Todd, wildlife biologist for the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife, who started working to restore the eagles in 1976. In 2001, a pair of nesting eagles returned to the Moulton land. Today there are some 450 nesting pairs in the state, with a goal of having 600 by 2019.

Subjects

Eagles, Maine Dept Of Inland Fisheries And Wildlife

Full text is not available here. Please contact the Library for a copy of the article.

Share

COinS